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Snakes In The Ball Pit => Yay, I get to talk about me! => Topic started by: Ambious on July 10, 2016, 07:34:48 pm

Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ambious on July 10, 2016, 07:34:48 pm
Y'all know there're things that are only named the way they are in your very local area.

This for example:

(http://i.imgur.com/Z471NZi.jpg)

Is exclusively known in the Israeli Air-Force as...
 
NSFW content. Click to show.

There's also all sorts of weird pronunciations for things in my town that will only make sense in Hebrew so if I think of anything interesting that's language independent I'll add it later,

Anyway, what are some weird slang terms in your local area? I'm intrigued.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Cheapskate on July 10, 2016, 10:19:53 pm
In Island English, found here and in the Philippines, "nothing X" means "we don't have any X."

Example: "I'll have a smoothie." "Sorry, Sir Cheapskate, nothing bananas."

(Islanders know that Americans should be called "sir" or "miss," but also know that Americans like to be called by their first names, so Americans are usually addressed as "Sir John" or "Miss Mary.")

Islanders also use the word "already" to indicate past tense.

Example: "I already order more bananas."
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Liatai on July 10, 2016, 11:01:22 pm
"Farm time" or "mountain time." Well, usually we use "(name of rural town) time," but for the sake of this thread, I'll call it farm time.

ex. "Where IS Phil? We were supposed to meet here fifteen minutes ago!" "Dude, remember, Phil runs on farm time. He could be anywhere from an hour early to an hour late from the time you gave him. Be patient."

It's a well-understood phenomenon around here; rural folks have a long way to drive to meet up with people, and tasks always seem to either pop up at the last minute or take longer than you expect when you live in the middle of nowhere. So, folks either leave their house WAY early to compensate for potential troubles; or, they show up late because a tree fell in the road, or they had to stoke a recalcitrant wood stove's fire before leaving the house, or something.

Rural-bred folks tend to understand farm time and just nod and go on as usual if you're early or late. City-bred or suburban-bred folks have a harder time with it. It's best to err on the early side of farm time with them, though you still get some odd looks.

Oh, and jokingly, "transplant." ex. "Oh, my family's from around here, but I didn't grow up in these woods. I'm a transplant." :B
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Cirr on July 11, 2016, 10:45:08 am
Hi I'm from the UK, I'd be here forever if I actually went into exhaustive detail.

I'll just leave you with "slightly on the huh" -- something that is tilted or askew.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Nifty Nif on July 11, 2016, 06:47:35 pm
I love Ohio pronunciation for local place names.  Here's a quick guide:
Dayton = Day'n
Mentor = Menner
Versailles = Ver-sails
Lima = like the bean
Russia (the one in the southern part of the state, not the north) = Ru-shie
Medina = Muh-die-nah
There are more cities and towns that have weirdly-pronounced names, I'm sure.  These are just my favorites because they're the worst offenders.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ambious on July 13, 2016, 04:35:18 am
In Hebrew the word "neighborhood" is slang for something that's lax in either standards, supervision, seriousness or all of the above.
Like if you go into the post office and the workers there are busy listening to loud music and talking football instead of working, you say "This place is a neighborhood" or even "They're having a neighborhood"
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: NutshellGulag on July 13, 2016, 11:32:41 am
Not much here. The only thing I ever had someone comment on is that we use the word "spendy" a lot.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Carbon on July 13, 2016, 11:42:49 am
I love Ohio pronunciation for local place names.  Here's a quick guide:
Dayton = Day'n
Mentor = Menner
Versailles = Ver-sails
Lima = like the bean
Russia (the one in the southern part of the state, not the north) = Ru-shie
Medina = Muh-die-nah
There are more cities and towns that have weirdly-pronounced names, I'm sure.  These are just my favorites because they're the worst offenders.
Nifty Nif, July 11, 2016, 06:47:35 pm

In Illinois we have a Cairo, and we pronounce it kay-row. We also pronounce both Ses in Des Plaines. I'm not sure about any local slang though.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: jack chick on July 13, 2016, 01:28:53 pm
in the bay area:
San Mateo is pronounced Sam-ah-TAY-oh
Los Gatos = Loss GAT-us
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ambious on July 13, 2016, 01:31:06 pm
This is less of a "slang" and more of a local joke, but the Haifa cable car is jokingly named after the testicles of the mayor at the time it was built - and simply known as "Gur-El's Balls". It looks like this:

(http://i.imgur.com/lFIiyxf.jpg)
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: A Whirring Bone-White Gleech on July 20, 2016, 01:42:23 pm
I live in Atlanta, and nothing's coming to mind.

We have a couple of cities and landmarks down here named after French people, and the locals have mauled those names, but that's par for the course.  For example, lake Lanier, which is pronounced like the word "near" (like "la neer", or sometimes "li neer").
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Liatai on July 20, 2016, 02:24:09 pm
We have a Greenwich near here. You are immediately fingered as an out-of-towner or non-local if you pronounce it properly. It's "green-witch" here, not "grennitch." I got teased mercilessly about slipping up once for about a year by relatives. XP
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: jack chick on July 20, 2016, 02:44:42 pm
I live in Atlanta, and nothing's coming to mind.

We have a couple of cities and landmarks down here named after French people, and the locals have mauled those names, but that's par for the course.  For example, lake Lanier, which is pronounced like the word "near" (like "la neer", or sometimes "li neer").
Der Trommelngleech, July 20, 2016, 01:42:23 pm

dear god really?

ask for directions in atlanta to literally anywhere and there is an immediate follow up question of, "where the fuck is the big chicken"?

see also: where the ol' schoolyard used ta be.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: A Whirring Bone-White Gleech on July 20, 2016, 03:22:45 pm
I live in Atlanta, and nothing's coming to mind.

We have a couple of cities and landmarks down here named after French people, and the locals have mauled those names, but that's par for the course.  For example, lake Lanier, which is pronounced like the word "near" (like "la neer", or sometimes "li neer").
Der Trommelngleech, July 20, 2016, 01:42:23 pm

dear god really?

ask for directions in atlanta to literally anywhere and there is an immediate follow up question of, "where the fuck is the big chicken"?

see also: where the ol' schoolyard used ta be.
jack chick, July 20, 2016, 02:44:42 pm

I assume you mean this thing:
(http://www.marietta.com/images/the-big-chicken.jpg)
It's actually in Marietta, not Atlanta. :P  I've lived here like 7 years and I've never had it mentioned to me.

Local story, I'm not sure if it's actually true.  That thing was damaged by a hurricane, and they had to rebuild it, because planes flying into the Atlanta airport were using it to navigate.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Nifty Nif on July 20, 2016, 07:36:03 pm
I live in Atlanta, and nothing's coming to mind.

We have a couple of cities and landmarks down here named after French people, and the locals have mauled those names, but that's par for the course.  For example, lake Lanier, which is pronounced like the word "near" (like "la neer", or sometimes "li neer").
Der Trommelngleech, July 20, 2016, 01:42:23 pm

dear god really?

ask for directions in atlanta to literally anywhere and there is an immediate follow up question of, "where the fuck is the big chicken"?

see also: where the ol' schoolyard used ta be.
jack chick, July 20, 2016, 02:44:42 pm

I assume you mean this thing:
(http://www.marietta.com/images/the-big-chicken.jpg)
It's actually in Marietta, not Atlanta. :P  I've lived here like 7 years and I've never had it mentioned to me.

Local story, I'm not sure if it's actually true.  That thing was damaged by a hurricane, and they had to rebuild it, because planes flying into the Atlanta airport were using it to navigate.
Der Trommelngleech, July 20, 2016, 03:22:45 pm

I love this, and Lake Lanier too, the good old ce-ment pond. I mixed this place up with another place. This is not the place I was thinking of but I still like it.

In local Ohio lore, there is Touchdown Jesus, which has been replaced with Come At Me Bro Jesus. A large statue of Jesus coming out of a pond with his arms upraised in "touchdown!" position was hit by lightning some years back, probably as an indicator of the Solid Rock Church's hubris or something. Of course, they rebuilt it with lightning rods on it, and its horrible legacy stands facing I-75 to this day.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ambious on August 03, 2016, 03:48:36 pm
"Getting a direction" or "getting organized" or both local slang terms for acquiring drugs.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Avian on August 04, 2016, 11:28:12 pm
I live in Delaware. People here call everything south of the cmonster cock "lower slower Delaware" (LSD for short, yup). Depending on who you ask, this is either because people down there talk slower, or are slower mentally.

Also, they pronounce that word for H2O "woo-der" here.

Rehoboth is pronounced "Rehobeth" and Lewes has two syllables. Have fun properly pronouncing Hockessin and Appoquinomink.

Everything downstate is fields and farmland, and all directions are given in increments of time + long-since demolished landmarks. "Yeah 'bout 15 minutes from where that old tree in Mr. Johnson's yard got hit by lightening, but if you reach that road that got flooded last month, ya went too far."

You can legitimately drive through six towns without even noticing. They're just that small.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Quark-Antiquark on August 05, 2016, 09:14:08 am
I'm from Quebec. Basically every word here is  incomprehensible slang.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: jack chick on August 05, 2016, 10:22:09 am
I live in Delaware. People here call everything south of the cmonster cock "lower slower Delaware" (LSD for short, yup). Depending on who you ask, this is either because people down there talk slower, or are slower mentally.

Also, they pronounce that word for H2O "woo-der" here.

Rehoboth is pronounced "Rehobeth" and Lewes has two syllables. Have fun properly pronouncing Hockessin and Appoquinomink.

Everything downstate is fields and farmland, and all directions are given in increments of time + long-since demolished landmarks. "Yeah 'bout 15 minutes from where that old tree in Mr. Johnson's yard got hit by lightening, but if you reach that road that got flooded last month, ya went too far."

You can legitimately drive through six towns without even noticing. They're just that small.
Avian, August 04, 2016, 11:28:12 pm

are there any cultural constructs that separate delaware from any other state or is it just a tax haven
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Avian on August 05, 2016, 03:23:57 pm
I live in Delaware. People here call everything south of the cmonster cock "lower slower Delaware" (LSD for short, yup). Depending on who you ask, this is either because people down there talk slower, or are slower mentally.

Also, they pronounce that word for H2O "woo-der" here.

Rehoboth is pronounced "Rehobeth" and Lewes has two syllables. Have fun properly pronouncing Hockessin and Appoquinomink.

Everything downstate is fields and farmland, and all directions are given in increments of time + long-since demolished landmarks. "Yeah 'bout 15 minutes from where that old tree in Mr. Johnson's yard got hit by lightening, but if you reach that road that got flooded last month, ya went too far."

You can legitimately drive through six towns without even noticing. They're just that small.
Avian, August 04, 2016, 11:28:12 pm

are there any cultural constructs that separate delaware from any other state or is it just a tax haven
jack chick, August 05, 2016, 10:22:09 am

The latter. Delaware exists as this weird tax free extension of its surrounding states.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Bodark on August 05, 2016, 07:43:39 pm
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Achilles' Heelies on August 06, 2016, 03:12:14 pm
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ

Bodark, August 05, 2016, 07:43:39 pm
I'm from Washington, and I think the word crick can provide important distinction. A crick is a creek where you are more likely to find old tires and kitchen appliances in the water.  All cricks are creeks, not all creeks are cricks.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: montrith on August 06, 2016, 04:26:34 pm
Probably mostly limited to my family, but my mom and her siblings were in the habit of saying "Smell a flower" when they wanted to swear at someone. See, my grandpa did not allow swearing in the house, so they came up all sorts of weird euphemisms, like "Smell a flower a cow ate yesterday", shortened to "Smell a flower", basically meaning "Put your nose into a pile of shit".

My roommate says "It's raining like from Esther's ass" a lot. I've never figured out who Esther was and why it's raining in her ass.

Local dialect from my home town is pretty much responsible for the worst/best pun in the Finnish language. The Finnish word for "live" is "elš" and the word for "do not" is "šlš", but where I'm from we use "elš" for "do not". The word for "die" is "kuole". Thus the joke:

A man is sitting on the bedside of his dying mother, muttering to himself "Elš kuole, elš kuole". With her final bit of strength the mother raises her arm, hits him over the head and says "Make up your bloody mind!"
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Bodark on August 06, 2016, 04:39:13 pm
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ

Bodark, August 05, 2016, 07:43:39 pm
I'm from Washington, and I think the word crick can provide important distinction. A crick is a creek where you are more likely to find old tires and kitchen appliances in the water.  All cricks are creeks, not all creeks are cricks.
Achilles' Heelies, August 06, 2016, 03:12:14 pm

It can definitely be an important distinction. It also seems to depend on whether or not you can catch crawdads in it.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Liatai on August 06, 2016, 08:53:59 pm
In related, somewhat amusing slang; there are creeks around here, true, but there are also kills. "Kill" is just another word for a stream, a brook, or a creek -- descended from Dutch, I think. But I've only ever seen and heard it used around here. The words are often used to describe branches of the same body of water interchangeably -- for example, I live near a tributary of Black Creek, which is itself a branch of the Batten Kill. (Which is sometimes erroneously called the Battenkill River -- that's like saying ATM machine! XP)

Not really slang, but it amused us as kids. :B "Oh no! Run for your life, Batten!"
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: SirSlarty on August 07, 2016, 11:40:04 pm
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ

Bodark, August 05, 2016, 07:43:39 pm
I'm from Washington, and I think the word crick can provide important distinction. A crick is a creek where you are more likely to find old tires and kitchen appliances in the water.  All cricks are creeks, not all creeks are cricks.
Achilles' Heelies, August 06, 2016, 03:12:14 pm

I'm from South Eastern PA and every waterway is called a "crick".
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: MISANDRY CANNON on August 30, 2016, 02:17:46 am
We here in Ohioland call road verges devil's strips for whatever reason.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Goose Goose Honk At Me Now on October 03, 2016, 11:54:34 pm
Also kinda family slang, but most of us (especially on my mother's side) use the term "womperjawed" to mean something that is askew or weirdly tilted. Like so: "Did you get dressed in the dark? Your shirt's all womperjawed."

That's the closest spelling I can guess at, because I've never seen the word on paper.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ragnarok Boobies on October 04, 2016, 05:53:48 am
My dad and I have a word I would spell as "butt-lochs" used to describe when a person becomes so fat that when they walk the fat from their front sways pushing the excess back fat into creases that look remarkably similar to extra butt cracks.

We used to dine at an all you can eat chinese buffet restaurant as much for the MSG-laced food as for the live entertainment that inevitably waddled into view.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ambious on October 04, 2016, 07:18:03 am
I think this one might be universal, but going out from your house to the street is "coming down" (and conversely going inside the house from the street is "going up"), even if you live below or on the street level.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Fatty Bo Batty on October 04, 2016, 09:25:44 am
In Northern Colorado, dude, man, and guys are all gender/age/race neutral. Also boy/girl is used far more often than men/women.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: SATAN MILKSHAKE on October 04, 2016, 10:50:53 am
I lived in southern California for about seven years and the list of things that "dude" refers to includes your shoes, the weather, your car, the burger you're eating, and ennui.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Fatty Bo Batty on October 04, 2016, 12:17:17 pm
I lived in southern California for about seven years and the list of things that "dude" refers to includes your shoes, the weather, your car, the burger you're eating, and ennui.
EYE OF ZA, October 04, 2016, 10:50:53 am

Yeah, we get a lot of that since Californians have been flocking here for years.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Acierocolotl on October 04, 2016, 01:08:03 pm
Hello folks!

Let me apologize in advance, I'm on a strictly English keyboard so I can't bang in the accents as required.  Anyway!  What Quark-Antiquark was hinting at, but never really got into, was les sacres.  It's a very unique form of cussing unique to la belle province, where all the cusswords are items pertaining to Catholic faith and ritual.  There's a lot of different words, though they all broadly translate to "fuckin'!" and you can organize them however you want, making for individualized, very personal forms of extremely (literally!) profane swearing.

"Calice d'ostie de bapteme d'un maudit chien-sale" I'd probably translate as "Goddamn motherfuckin' dog!" but is, literally, "Chalice of a host of a baptismal font of a damned dirty dog,"  Ah, Quebec!  (There are, as an aside, many, many 'gosh darn!' equivalents of course.)

And, similar to Montrith's anecdote, my mother was fond of saying, "Avance, Hercule," as a sort of joke and a commentary on redundant instructions.  As her explanation went, this was an instruction you'd give your horse were it named Hercules.  "Forward!"  However, "Hercule" sounds very similar to "recule", or "reverse".  So you'd be giving contradictory orders to your horse unless you enunciated clearly.  Mom jokes!
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: cashmir sweaters on December 31, 2016, 06:14:58 pm
In central and eastern Oregon ground squirrels are called 'rats'.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Yavuz on December 31, 2016, 11:57:34 pm
In central and eastern Oregon ground squirrels are called 'rats'.
cashmir sweaters, December 31, 2016, 06:14:58 pm

When I went to Philmont Scout Ranch as a young Boy Scout, we called the chipmunks/ground squirrels "minibears".
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Corn Syrup on January 01, 2017, 03:45:17 am
In North Carolina, a nickname for groundhogs is "whistlepigs". This knowledge has led me to make questionable whiskey purchases.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Bobguinary Novel on January 02, 2017, 12:47:14 am
Maybe not slang, but the habit of communicating distance via time. The store isn't 10 miles away, its 15 minutes away.

Yoopers and trolls - slang for people who live in the upper and lower peninsulas, respectively.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Blandest on January 02, 2017, 01:46:11 am
In Sydney the single seats on trains are called Nigel seats (as in Nigel no friends) whereas where I am living now in Sussex they are called Larry seats (as in Larry Lonesome).
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Goose Goose Honk At Me Now on January 06, 2017, 04:53:19 pm
In Sydney the single seats on trains are called Nigel seats (as in Nigel no friends) whereas where I am living now in Sussex they are called Larry seats (as in Larry Lonesome).
Blandest, January 02, 2017, 01:46:11 am
Perhaps some day we'll read the triumphant story of the No Friends-Lonesome wedding.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ambious on January 08, 2017, 09:54:34 am
Getting a lift from someone (in a car) is called "getting a tramp" in Israel
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: izzy on January 10, 2017, 07:16:11 am
At my old college, we used to call messing around on the internet as "squidding".

"You doing anything tonight?"
"Nah. Probably just gonna stay in and squid."
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: MilfParade on January 14, 2017, 01:02:41 am
In Philly, and we really do call most anything "jawn." i.e. "Hand me that jawn."

See also Rap Snacks, which are also jawns, and which I know exist outside the city but I have not seen.

Personally, otherwise, I don't speak with a philly accent, but there is a very specific way you would say "hoagie" if you were from here, and it's basically "heauxgie."

Subs don't exist.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: jack chick on January 14, 2017, 06:25:12 pm
In Philly, and we really do call most anything "jawn." i.e. "Hand me that jawn."

See also Rap Snacks, which are also jawns, and which I know exist outside the city but I have not seen.

Personally, otherwise, I don't speak with a philly accent, but there is a very specific way you would say "hoagie" if you were from here, and it's basically "heauxgie."

Subs don't exist.
MilfParade, January 14, 2017, 01:02:41 am

man your navy must SUCK
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: nuffkins, of all people, on January 15, 2017, 12:43:22 pm
In Philly, and we really do call most anything "jawn." i.e. "Hand me that jawn."

See also Rap Snacks, which are also jawns, and which I know exist outside the city but I have not seen.

Personally, otherwise, I don't speak with a philly accent, but there is a very specific way you would say "hoagie" if you were from here, and it's basically "heauxgie."

Subs don't exist.
MilfParade, January 14, 2017, 01:02:41 am

man your navy must SUCK
jack chick, January 14, 2017, 06:25:12 pm

Don't be so negative, Jack.

That said, it must be weird living in a city that dominant.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: SirSlarty on January 16, 2017, 09:29:04 pm
In Philly, and we really do call most anything "jawn." i.e. "Hand me that jawn."

See also Rap Snacks, which are also jawns, and which I know exist outside the city but I have not seen.

Personally, otherwise, I don't speak with a philly accent, but there is a very specific way you would say "hoagie" if you were from here, and it's basically "heauxgie."

Subs don't exist.
MilfParade, January 14, 2017, 01:02:41 am

I'm only 40 miles away in the PA boonies and I didn't even know that about subs/sandwhiches/hoagies/meatstuckbetweenbread naming conventions.
Though if you go a few miles then you hear "do you want your pop in a sack?" instead of "would you like your soda in a bag?" (or vice versa).

Is "jawn" just a weird pronunciation of "one"?

Around rural SE PA, people will have your head for saying "water" wrong.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: cashmir sweaters on January 16, 2017, 10:52:43 pm
Maybe it's just my family but we've always called bottle openers "church keys"
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: chai tea latte on January 16, 2017, 11:26:43 pm
Maybe it's just my family but we've always called bottle openers "church keys"
cashmir sweaters, January 16, 2017, 10:52:43 pm
Not just your family. Traditionally a key for church doors was more ceremonial (or to keep them from blowing open in the wind) than for real security, so they'd often have a large embellished handle (to go with the larger doors and locking mechanism). Take a look at this one and you'll see a pretty obvious resemblance to the thing you and I call a 'church key':
(http://i.imgur.com/M92RMaOm.jpg)
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: cashmir sweaters on January 16, 2017, 11:35:30 pm
Maybe it's just my family but we've always called bottle openers "church keys"
cashmir sweaters, January 16, 2017, 10:52:43 pm
Not just your family. Traditionally a key for church doors was more ceremonial (or to keep them from blowing open in the wind) than for real security, so they'd often have a large embellished handle (to go with the larger doors and locking mechanism). Take a look at this one and you'll see a pretty obvious resemblance to the thing you and I call a 'church key':
(http://i.imgur.com/M92RMaOm.jpg)
almond chai, January 16, 2017, 11:26:43 pm

Wow thanks!
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: A Meat on January 17, 2017, 03:58:03 am
Around rural SE PA, people will have your head for saying "water" wrong.
sirslarty, January 16, 2017, 09:29:04 pm
what's the correct pronunciation of water? I can think of three discrete ways ways I've heard it said aloud, but I don't know which is that SE PA acceptable one
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ragnarok Boobies on January 17, 2017, 01:15:56 pm
Not really local slang, but my dad and I both call overly large belt buckles "Dinner Plates".
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: SirSlarty on January 17, 2017, 05:03:24 pm
Around rural SE PA, people will have your head for saying "water" wrong.
sirslarty, January 16, 2017, 09:29:04 pm
what's the correct pronunciation of water? I can think of three discrete ways ways I've heard it said aloud, but I don't know which is that SE PA acceptable one
A Meat, January 17, 2017, 03:58:03 am

This is a great question and I'll let you know if I ever find out.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: bigfangirl on February 26, 2017, 11:59:55 pm
I've learned that Boston is the only place where you can get a "lahge iced CAWfee with milk and sugah" in the middle of winter and have it not be weird. Also, you can tell the Dunkin' Donuts people to "double cup it" and they'll put a  styrofoam cup over your plastic cup so you can wander around in the snow with iced coffee without your hands getting cold.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: jack chick on February 27, 2017, 12:01:02 pm
I've learned that Boston is the only place where you can get a "lahge iced CAWfee with milk and sugah" in the middle of winter and have it not be weird. Also, you can tell the Dunkin' Donuts people to "double cup it" and they'll put a  styrofoam cup over your plastic cup so you can wander around in the snow with iced coffee without your hands getting cold.
bigfangirl, February 26, 2017, 11:59:55 pm

oh man that reminds me how you could tell who was from new york cause they'd always pour some of their coffee in the garbage for some random ass reason
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: bigfangirl on February 27, 2017, 12:54:58 pm
I've learned that Boston is the only place where you can get a "lahge iced CAWfee with milk and sugah" in the middle of winter and have it not be weird. Also, you can tell the Dunkin' Donuts people to "double cup it" and they'll put a  styrofoam cup over your plastic cup so you can wander around in the snow with iced coffee without your hands getting cold.
bigfangirl, February 26, 2017, 11:59:55 pm

oh man that reminds me how you could tell who was from new york cause they'd always pour some of their coffee in the garbage for some random ass reason
jack chick, February 27, 2017, 12:01:02 pm
I'm originally from New York and the reason for that that I've always seen is because coffee shops never leave room for milk in the actual cup so if you're gonna put milk in you need to pour some out first. It's so wasteful feeling though so I always try to ask for them to leave room for milk if possible.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Eider Duck on February 27, 2017, 02:42:19 pm
Well, I'm Scottish, so there's no way I could fill just one post detailing all the weird slang we have. So instead I'll just talk about cunts.

If you're in Glasgow, it's possible (and somewhat common) to be called a cunt in a complimentary way. It's entirely dependant on context though, as it can also be used as an insult exclusively used towards men. This seems to be much more common in Glasgow than other parts of Scotland though, so I don't recommend calling someone a lovely cunt in Aberdeen, for example, unless you really know the person well.

Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Malten on February 28, 2017, 03:01:56 am
Accidentally thinking you know someone well enough to call them a cunt is a bad time. :(
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Eider Duck on February 28, 2017, 05:44:28 pm
If in doubt, just say that they're "pure braw" or "affy fine". Both mean roughly "pretty great" in English and you don't risk getting a punch for saying them on accident ;)
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Ven Malakim on March 01, 2017, 01:26:43 am
Well, I'm Scottish, so there's no way I could fill just one post detailing all the weird slang we have. So instead I'll just talk about cunts.

If you're in Glasgow, it's possible (and somewhat common) to be called a cunt in a complimentary way. It's entirely dependant on context though, as it can also be used as an insult exclusively used towards men. This seems to be much more common in Glasgow than other parts of Scotland though, so I don't recommend calling someone a lovely cunt in Aberdeen, for example, unless you really know the person well.
Eider Duck, February 27, 2017, 02:42:19 pm

Speaking as an Australian there is definitely a point during a heated discussion where calling someone a cunt can mean you're siding with them, whereas referring to them as mate indicates you're a hair away from drawing blood.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Blandest on March 01, 2017, 01:36:01 am
Well, I'm Scottish, so there's no way I could fill just one post detailing all the weird slang we have. So instead I'll just talk about cunts.

If you're in Glasgow, it's possible (and somewhat common) to be called a cunt in a complimentary way. It's entirely dependant on context though, as it can also be used as an insult exclusively used towards men. This seems to be much more common in Glasgow than other parts of Scotland though, so I don't recommend calling someone a lovely cunt in Aberdeen, for example, unless you really know the person well.
Eider Duck, February 27, 2017, 02:42:19 pm

Speaking as an Australian there is definitely a point during a heated discussion where calling someone a cunt can mean you're siding with them, whereas referring to them as mate indicates you're a hair away from drawing blood.
A Shark Messiah, March 01, 2017, 01:26:43 am

I always love it when an American guest appears on one of the Australian public broadcaster's radio shows and then asks if they can say a word like shit not realising that, the last time I checked, the only word censored on either RN or Triple J was cunt.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Muffinator on March 06, 2017, 04:26:51 pm
"Yeah nah yeah" is a phrase that confuses the fuck out of tourists, because it means both yes and no, depending on where the emphasis is.

'Yeah nah yeah' means yes, and 'yeah nah yeah' means no.

'Chur' is 'thank you'. The North has a lot of Maori influence so you get stuff like

Haere mai: literally "come here" but it's a general way of getting attention.
Korero: talk
Koha: donation/gift
Tamariki: kids
Kai: food
ka pai: well done! awesome!

You won't often hear fluent 100% Maori in public but you'll often get it mixed in with English -- a common phrase is "haere mai, time for kai!"

'Sweet' means 'good'', and we use 'as' as an exclamation mark. Putting it all together: "Bro come over for kai." "Yeah nah yeah, sweet as, bro"
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Blandest on March 06, 2017, 04:58:23 pm
"Yeah nah yeah" is a phrase that confuses the fuck out of tourists, because it means both yes and no, depending on where the emphasis is.

'Yeah nah yeah' means yes, and 'yeah nah yeah' means no.

'Chur' is 'thank you'. The North has a lot of Maori influence so you get stuff like

Haere mai: literally "come here" but it's a general way of getting attention.
Korero: talk
Koha: donation/gift
Tamariki: kids
Kai: food
ka pai: well done! awesome!

You won't often hear fluent 100% Maori in public but you'll often get it mixed in with English -- a common phrase is "haere mai, time for kai!"

'Sweet' means 'good'', and we use 'as' as an exclamation mark. Putting it all together: "Bro come over for kai." "Yeah nah yeah, sweet as, bro"
Muffinator, March 06, 2017, 04:26:51 pm

Also from what I can tell sex is actually slang for the number six.

Sorry
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Muffinator on March 07, 2017, 12:41:55 am
yeah nah bro you're thinking of Australia

we pronounce it sucks
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Turbo Sexaphonic Delight on March 21, 2017, 06:08:48 pm
In the very rural nook of North Carolina I was raised in, we called irritating or lazy people "pecker gnats"

" Dammit Ray, quit being such a pecker gnat and help me get this tractor off the chicken coop before the coyotes show."
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Dirk Dammit on April 12, 2017, 07:30:46 am
I'm pretty sure the most Philadelphian thing you can possibly say is "Water Ice" pronounced "wooderice"

It's our word for Italian ice.
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Liatai on April 12, 2017, 11:19:48 am
I confused and concerned an out-of-town friend when I said I was gonna grab a nosh earlier today.

I grew up in an area with a very healthy Jewish population. I guess Yiddish isn't as ubiquitous as I believed. :B

(nosh (n,v) - snack, a light meal)
Title: Weird local slang
Post by: Shell Game on April 17, 2017, 10:33:42 pm
This is driving me nuts because I can't think of anything unique to western Oregon. The only person who could come up with anything when I asked could only come up with "spendy," which I really didn't think was that unique but I obviously don't know much about our dialect.
In central and eastern Oregon ground squirrels are called 'rats'.
cashmir sweaters, December 31, 2016, 06:14:58 pm
I didn't even know THAT, though I guess you guys have gray squirrels out there. They are pretty rat-like.