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Topic: Weird local slang  (Read 9517 times)

Ambious

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Weird local slang #15
"Getting a direction" or "getting organized" or both local slang terms for acquiring drugs.
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Weird local slang #16
I live in Delaware. People here call everything south of the cmonster cock "lower slower Delaware" (LSD for short, yup). Depending on who you ask, this is either because people down there talk slower, or are slower mentally.

Also, they pronounce that word for H2O "woo-der" here.

Rehoboth is pronounced "Rehobeth" and Lewes has two syllables. Have fun properly pronouncing Hockessin and Appoquinomink.

Everything downstate is fields and farmland, and all directions are given in increments of time + long-since demolished landmarks. "Yeah 'bout 15 minutes from where that old tree in Mr. Johnson's yard got hit by lightening, but if you reach that road that got flooded last month, ya went too far."

You can legitimately drive through six towns without even noticing. They're just that small.
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Weird local slang #17
I'm from Quebec. Basically every word here is  incomprehensible slang.
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Weird local slang #18
I live in Delaware. People here call everything south of the cmonster cock "lower slower Delaware" (LSD for short, yup). Depending on who you ask, this is either because people down there talk slower, or are slower mentally.

Also, they pronounce that word for H2O "woo-der" here.

Rehoboth is pronounced "Rehobeth" and Lewes has two syllables. Have fun properly pronouncing Hockessin and Appoquinomink.

Everything downstate is fields and farmland, and all directions are given in increments of time + long-since demolished landmarks. "Yeah 'bout 15 minutes from where that old tree in Mr. Johnson's yard got hit by lightening, but if you reach that road that got flooded last month, ya went too far."

You can legitimately drive through six towns without even noticing. They're just that small.
Avian, August 04, 2016, 11:28:12 pm

are there any cultural constructs that separate delaware from any other state or is it just a tax haven

Avian

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Weird local slang #19
I live in Delaware. People here call everything south of the cmonster cock "lower slower Delaware" (LSD for short, yup). Depending on who you ask, this is either because people down there talk slower, or are slower mentally.

Also, they pronounce that word for H2O "woo-der" here.

Rehoboth is pronounced "Rehobeth" and Lewes has two syllables. Have fun properly pronouncing Hockessin and Appoquinomink.

Everything downstate is fields and farmland, and all directions are given in increments of time + long-since demolished landmarks. "Yeah 'bout 15 minutes from where that old tree in Mr. Johnson's yard got hit by lightening, but if you reach that road that got flooded last month, ya went too far."

You can legitimately drive through six towns without even noticing. They're just that small.
Avian, August 04, 2016, 11:28:12 pm

are there any cultural constructs that separate delaware from any other state or is it just a tax haven
jack chick, August 05, 2016, 10:22:09 am

The latter. Delaware exists as this weird tax free extension of its surrounding states.

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Weird local slang #20
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ
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Weird local slang #21
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ

Bodark, August 05, 2016, 07:43:39 pm
I'm from Washington, and I think the word crick can provide important distinction. A crick is a creek where you are more likely to find old tires and kitchen appliances in the water.  All cricks are creeks, not all creeks are cricks.
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Weird local slang #22
Probably mostly limited to my family, but my mom and her siblings were in the habit of saying "Smell a flower" when they wanted to swear at someone. See, my grandpa did not allow swearing in the house, so they came up all sorts of weird euphemisms, like "Smell a flower a cow ate yesterday", shortened to "Smell a flower", basically meaning "Put your nose into a pile of shit".

My roommate says "It's raining like from Esther's ass" a lot. I've never figured out who Esther was and why it's raining in her ass.

Local dialect from my home town is pretty much responsible for the worst/best pun in the Finnish language. The Finnish word for "live" is "elš" and the word for "do not" is "šlš", but where I'm from we use "elš" for "do not". The word for "die" is "kuole". Thus the joke:

A man is sitting on the bedside of his dying mother, muttering to himself "Elš kuole, elš kuole". With her final bit of strength the mother raises her arm, hits him over the head and says "Make up your bloody mind!"
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Weird local slang #23
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ

Bodark, August 05, 2016, 07:43:39 pm
I'm from Washington, and I think the word crick can provide important distinction. A crick is a creek where you are more likely to find old tires and kitchen appliances in the water.  All cricks are creeks, not all creeks are cricks.
Achilles' Heelies, August 06, 2016, 03:12:14 pm

It can definitely be an important distinction. It also seems to depend on whether or not you can catch crawdads in it.
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Weird local slang #24
In related, somewhat amusing slang; there are creeks around here, true, but there are also kills. "Kill" is just another word for a stream, a brook, or a creek -- descended from Dutch, I think. But I've only ever seen and heard it used around here. The words are often used to describe branches of the same body of water interchangeably -- for example, I live near a tributary of Black Creek, which is itself a branch of the Batten Kill. (Which is sometimes erroneously called the Battenkill River -- that's like saying ATM machine! XP)

Not really slang, but it amused us as kids. :B "Oh no! Run for your life, Batten!"

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Weird local slang #25
Here's one from Oregon:

"Creek" is pronounced "crick," but not all the time. Rock Creek, for instance, can go either way. If you're going to a small, non-specific, moving body of water (to catch crawdads, perhaps), you're going to the crick. It depends on who you're talking to (usually older people), where you are (outside of Multnomah County), and how modern the neighborhood surrounding the creek is (residents of older, more rural places are more likely to say "crick").

Sometimes I say "crick" and I want to punch myself in the throat. ಠ_ಠ

Bodark, August 05, 2016, 07:43:39 pm
I'm from Washington, and I think the word crick can provide important distinction. A crick is a creek where you are more likely to find old tires and kitchen appliances in the water.  All cricks are creeks, not all creeks are cricks.
Achilles' Heelies, August 06, 2016, 03:12:14 pm

I'm from South Eastern PA and every waterway is called a "crick".
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Weird local slang #26
We here in Ohioland call road verges devil's strips for whatever reason.
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Weird local slang #27
Also kinda family slang, but most of us (especially on my mother's side) use the term "womperjawed" to mean something that is askew or weirdly tilted. Like so: "Did you get dressed in the dark? Your shirt's all womperjawed."

That's the closest spelling I can guess at, because I've never seen the word on paper.
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Weird local slang #28
My dad and I have a word I would spell as "butt-lochs" used to describe when a person becomes so fat that when they walk the fat from their front sways pushing the excess back fat into creases that look remarkably similar to extra butt cracks.

We used to dine at an all you can eat chinese buffet restaurant as much for the MSG-laced food as for the live entertainment that inevitably waddled into view.

Ambious

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Weird local slang #29
I think this one might be universal, but going out from your house to the street is "coming down" (and conversely going inside the house from the street is "going up"), even if you live below or on the street level.