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Topic: Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3  (Read 3743 times)

Lemon

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« on: September 06, 2016, 10:32:16 pm »
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DetectiveSlowpoke

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2016, 12:37:25 am »
[yayvictor]
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Ambious

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2016, 06:56:02 am »
Re: Jupiter and definition of planet

Edit: the following is entirely wrong, there seems to be a valid issue with both the definitions of "orbit" and "planet".
Wonder if this will be brought up in the next IAU conference.




The actual definition of a planet is that it orbits the system's barycenter - which is the point around which two or more bodies orbit (technically speaking - every orbit is actually several bodies that go around a common barycenter - we just say that one is orbiting the other if that barycenter is within the physical body of the other). So if you average out the barycenter of the entire system, Jupiter still orbits that.
Another example would be a binary system, where you have two stars that orbit a common barycenter:



Any planet in this system would also not orbit any single star because its barycenter with both stars would likely be around the stars' own barycenter, but for binary system we have different definitions of "orbit".

As for Jupiter, it does NOT in fact orbit the sun - just because it is so massive that it skews the sun's own orbit around its own center of gravity enough to create a common barycenter between them that is outside the sun's body, and thus causes it to act like a very extreme binary star system, and so the sun and Jupiter orbit a common barycenter:






This would be an actual orbit:


In that regard, just like two stars in a binary system don't "orbit each other", or one doesn't orbit the other - Jupiter doesn't orbit the sun (nor does the sun orbit Jupiter), but rather they both orbit a common third point - their barycenter.
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« Last Edit: September 07, 2016, 05:38:16 pm by Ambious was a mistake »

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2016, 08:07:54 am »
Make Victor the host of this podcast so you can call it Yay! Answers.
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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2016, 09:25:25 am »
Make Victor the host of this podcast so you can call it Yay! Answers.
No.  He's the MC, I'm the DJ.
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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2016, 09:36:19 am »
Also Iron Sky was awesome and you should definitely watch it.

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2016, 04:15:49 pm »
Re: Jupiter and definition of planet
The actual definition of a planet is that it orbits the system's barycenter
I take issue with this a little bit. I realize this is mostly just an issue with words, but the IAU requires that a planet "is in orbit around the sun." There is no mention of the word "barycenter" in their definition. Perhaps worse, if the first condition were reworded to say "orbit the system's barycenter" then any star would itself be a planet of it's own system (provided there's at least one other object with a non-negligible amount of gravity).

With this new revelation it sounds like the IAU needs to come up with a new definition.
Liatai

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2016, 05:30:27 pm »
Re: Jupiter and definition of planet
The actual definition of a planet is that it orbits the system's barycenter
I take issue with this a little bit. I realize this is mostly just an issue with words, but the IAU requires that a planet "is in orbit around the sun." There is no mention of the word "barycenter" in their definition. Perhaps worse, if the first condition were reworded to say "orbit the system's barycenter" then any star would itself be a planet of it's own system (provided there's at least one other object with a non-negligible amount of gravity).

With this new revelation it sounds like the IAU needs to come up with a new definition.

You make a valid point, I read that barycenter thing elsewhere and it is apparently both incorrect and problematic on its own.

sincerelyest

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2016, 02:36:02 am »
This podcast is pretty great and I'm going to continue spamming my hopes you guys keep doing them.

To be honest I think you might have formalized and solved that 10-gallon hat question more effectively than even history.com:

Quote
The popular image of a cowboy would not be complete without the wide-brimmed “10-gallon hat,” yet even the most hardened cattlemen can’t agree on how the iconic headgear first got its name. The conventional explanation is that “10-gallon” refers to how much liquid could be carried inside the hat. In fact, a famous ad for the Stetson company once even depicted a cowpoke giving his weary horse a drink from the crown of his hat. While it’s certainly in keeping with the romantic conception of life in the Old West, this image is probably as much of a myth as gunfights at high noon. Not only is the name “10-gallon hat” an obvious exaggeration—even the most comically large cowboy hats could only hold a few quarts of water—carrying liquid in the crown of any hat would most likely damage it beyond repair.

Most experts argue that the name “10-gallon hat” is actually an import from south of the border. Cattle drivers and ranchers in Texas and the Southwest often crossed paths with Mexican vaqueros who sported braided hatbands—called “galóns” in Spanish—on their sombreros. A “10 galón” sombrero was a hat with a large enough crown that it could hold 10 hatbands, but American cowboys may have anglicized the word to “gallon” and started referring to their own sombrero-inspired headgear as “10-gallon hats.” Yet another linguistic theory argues that the name is a corruption of the Spanish phrase “tan galán” —roughly translated as “very gallant” or “really handsome”—which may have been used to describe the majestic image of a hat-wearing cowboy in the saddle.

Whatever its origin, the 10-gallon hat wasn’t even the preferred headgear for most people in the Wild West—top hats and bowlers were more common. The nickname didn’t enter the popular lexicon until the 1920s, when silent film stars like Tom Mix and Tim McCoy helped popularize the oversized hat in Hollywood Westerns. The 10-gallon hat went on to earn a place as a quintessential piece of the frontier wardrobe, and presidents like Harry Truman and Lyndon B. Johnson would later use them to cultivate a rustic image while serving as commander in chief.

http://www.history.com/news/ask-history/why-do-we-call-it-a-10-gallon-hat

Liatai

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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2016, 11:23:00 pm »
Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge (or Every Good Boy Does Fine) are all well and good mnemonics for the lines on the treble clef, but my personal favorite is "Empty Garbage Before Dad Flips!" XP

Good episode, yay Victor, yay everybody, more please! X3
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« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2016, 09:17:55 am »
This is how I learned the planets of the solar system. It was played at the local planetarium.

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« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2016, 12:03:37 pm »
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Adjudicated Guess, Episode 3
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2016, 02:19:29 am »
I'm sad I don't have another episode of this podcast to listen.  Guess I'll dig up some facts.
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