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December 19, 2018, 04:24:00 am

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Topic: Unrelated Law Things  (Read 2462 times)

Cheapskate

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Unrelated Law Things
« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2018, 07:08:08 am »
Thereís not enough information here to determine if Dean is a property manager.

Liatai

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Unrelated Law Things
« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2018, 07:03:04 pm »
Is there anything legally someone can do if an abusive relative keeps trying to get in contact with them, even if the person does not want contact with the abusive relative? The abuse is not physical or sexual, the abuser is very careful not to lay a hand on the victim(s).

If the person tells the relative no, or just doesn't reply, the abuser has a history of showing up uninvited (from six hours away, no less) just to chew the person out and try to force them into contact. Usually by offering expensive gifts and then getting offended and angry, saying things like "look at how much money and gas I spent to get here and on this thing, this is all your fault! I'M A NICE GUY!"

Cheapskate

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Unrelated Law Things
« Reply #32 on: September 17, 2018, 10:28:13 pm »
In some states, that makes you eligible for a restraining order: in others, it doesnít.

In any state, you can send anyone a letter telling them that you donít want any more contact with them, and that if they arrive at your property, youíll call the police to report them for trespassing. Some states may also allow telephone harassment charges if you get too many calls or messages.

If you live near a family justice center, visit them for help with safety planning.
Liatai

Liatai

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Unrelated Law Things
« Reply #33 on: September 17, 2018, 11:04:33 pm »
Two questions, then -- one, if someone's renting their place of residence, do they still have the right legally to tell someone to get off "their" property? Where does that right extend to? If someone were, say, lurking outside the apartment door or sitting in the parking lot waiting for the inhabitant(s) to leave. The landlord does not live on the premises.

And two, if the victim did need to call the police due to the abuser testing boundaries and showing up uninvited in spite of a letter (which the victim has retained dated copies of, of course), what would be best to say to the police to inform them of the situation? Ideally to reduce the risk of someone getting shot as much as possible, because these people do live in the USA. ^^;

Cheapskate

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Unrelated Law Things
« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2018, 05:09:00 pm »
The tenantís right to exclude someone extends to all the areas in the lease, not to any common areas in an apartment complex. The landlord can exclude people from any common areas.

If you trespass someone and they come back, tell the police youíve trespassed someone and they came back. If the police shoot the trespasser, itís not your fault.